You’ve Got to be Carefully Taught

Last night I went to an Iftar celebration. It was sponsored by the Greater Boston Muslim Health Initiative - a group that periodically meets to focus on specific health needs of the Muslim community in the area. It was an eclectic group of people, each of us with strengths in different areas, community members and … Continue reading You’ve Got to be Carefully Taught

On Monasteries, Children, and Loving Our Enemies

Gunmen Kill at Least 28 Coptic Christians in Egypt The headline spares nothing, except that there were children. I numbly read the article describing the pilgrimage. The group was headed to St. Samuel Monastery for a pilgrimage when pick up trucks reportedly drove up to the busses and began firing automatic weapons. I read as … Continue reading On Monasteries, Children, and Loving Our Enemies

The Story of a Christian/Muslim Friendship – a Guest Post

Every September, when cool breezes off the Nile River replaced the sweltering heat of summer, the expatriate community in Cairo, Egypt would reunite. Most employers planned a variety of activities to introduce any newcomers to Egypt in general, and the gigantic city of Cairo in particular. Our employer, the American University of Cairo, put together … Continue reading The Story of a Christian/Muslim Friendship – a Guest Post

International Women’s Day 2017 – #BeBoldForChange

Every year I write about International Women's Day - the day set aside to honor women, to highlight the critical role they play in all of life. From nurturing life at its earliest stages to nurturing families, communities, and countries, women are critical to human survival. Not only do women change the world within homes … Continue reading International Women’s Day 2017 – #BeBoldForChange

I am Not Muslim: On Identiy Confusion Solidarity

During the weekend, an "I am a Muslim too" rally took place in New York City at Times Square. A picture of the event shows a large crowd gathered, all mouths opened in unison. A couple of white women are front and center, holding signs of a woman in a hijab made up of stars and … Continue reading I am Not Muslim: On Identiy Confusion Solidarity

The Bubbles Inside our Heads

Every time I do a workshop on culturally responsive health care, I use the picture above. The audience sees it on a big screen and I give them a minute to take it in. Then I ask them "What's wrong with this picture?" It's not long until someone gets it; until someone says "They are stereotyping … Continue reading The Bubbles Inside our Heads

A Challenge to Christians During Ramadan

I am on the mailing list of a large mosque in the Roxbury area of Boston. While Egypt's minarets give us a journey through history and Turkey boasts Ottoman style mosques, the mosque in Roxbury is modern. It sits across from Roxbury Community College, its dome and minaret smaller than those in the Muslim world. I've … Continue reading A Challenge to Christians During Ramadan

Beware: the Language of Heaven is Hell for the Passenger

While living in the Middle East, we would often quote Islamic scholars and proclaim that we were "learning the language that we'll all speak in Heaven." We were not joking. With its rich phrases and flow, Arabic is a beautiful language. After five minutes in a taxi in an Arabic speaking country, the beautiful sound of Oum Kalthoum's voice will … Continue reading Beware: the Language of Heaven is Hell for the Passenger

“Go and Do Likewise”

Almost every week I see some sort of announcement on social media about an event that speaks to Christians responding to Islam. Generally, these announcements add the phrase “in light of [insert phrase].”  The [insert phrase] has been everything from “recent attacks” to “current political climate” to “refugee crisis.” But never have I seen an … Continue reading “Go and Do Likewise”

How to Build a Bridge

In an old book titled Observations on the Re-building of London Bridge by John Seaward, he says this: It is generally acknowledged that the construction of a commodious bridge over a wide, impetuous river is one of the noblest efforts of human genius. In no country that has made any advances in civilization has the … Continue reading How to Build a Bridge

Waving Olive Branches

Olives are ubiquitous in the Middle East. Served with almost every meal, they vary in color and size, offering a pungent, salty taste. Eat them with bread and white cheese and you have a meal fit for royalty. The trees are everywhere – in gardens, along the sides of roads, and in churchyards. You cannot … Continue reading Waving Olive Branches

In the Face of Hate – Love Out Loud

in the face of hate - Love Out Loud by Robynn & Marilyn In Philadelphia, a severed pig's head is thrown at the door of a mosque. On the street in Boston a man tells a Muslim woman walking with her children that he hopes her children burn in hell. A Somali restaurant in North Dakota is burned. A Muslim shopkeeper … Continue reading In the Face of Hate – Love Out Loud

Love, Fear and the Syrian Refugee

The NYTimes Daily Briefing had this to say this morning: Donald J. Trump, called for a “total and complete shutdown” of Muslims entering the country. At an assembly at Liberty University on Friday, Jerry Falwell Jr., under the banner "Training Champions for Christ since 1971"  said this: “If more good people had concealed-carry permits, then we could end … Continue reading Love, Fear and the Syrian Refugee

Refugee Facts & Resources

I thought it would be helpful to compile resources here for those of you who are looking to know more about resettlement and how the refugee process works. The resources are a mixture of those found in the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, and New Zealand. Refugee Information: Federal Office of Refugee Resettlement … Continue reading Refugee Facts & Resources

Memories of Eid Celebrations عید مُبارک

Eid Mubarak to all my Muslim friends and readers today. Each year, the sighting of a crescent moon tells Muslims around the world the date of Eid al Fitr. With that date, a month of fasting ends and festivities and celebrations begin.The second Eid celebration is always held on the tenth day of the Lunar month. This … Continue reading Memories of Eid Celebrations عید مُبارک

A Short Video Explains a Crisis

Tonight my husband and I will be at our church, sharing some stories and pictures from our trips this past year to Turkey, Lebanon, and Iraq. In the spirit of that talk, I offer you this short and challenging video. It will take six minutes of your time and it is the clearest explanation I … Continue reading A Short Video Explains a Crisis

A Life Overseas – Freedom from the Silence of Shame

I'm at A Life Overseas today, talking about a hard subject. I hope you'll join me there!  Long ago on a spring day in Cairo, I was walking across a small footbridge to the area of the city where I lived. I had crossed the footbridge hundreds of times, usually with one or three children … Continue reading A Life Overseas – Freedom from the Silence of Shame

Dear Mr. Graham, Let me Introduce you to Some Friends….

Dear Mr. Graham, I'd like to introduce you to some friends of mine.  The first friend is Golnaz. Golnaz is a bright and beautiful young woman from Iran. My husband first met her while working on a project at Harvard University. It was an instant friendship and soon after he met her, he invited her … Continue reading Dear Mr. Graham, Let me Introduce you to Some Friends….