5 Newton Street – a Love Story

5 Newton Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 It was ten and a half years ago when I first walked through your front door. I will never forget the day - December 18, and Boston was experiencing the worst winter they had had in five years. Snow was piled high around you - your porch barely passable … Continue reading 5 Newton Street – a Love Story

A Black Girl, A White Girl, and a Lemonade Stand

My subway stop in Cambridge is Central Square. I've written a bit about Central Square before, but the truth is, it's difficult to describe this area. While Harvard Square boasts history and sophistication and Kendall Square hosts Massachusetts Institute of Technology and nerdy innovation, Central Square is a cacophony of chaos. The community of homeless … Continue reading A Black Girl, A White Girl, and a Lemonade Stand

How Long?

Earlier in the week, Boston could not shake the heavy fog that lay heavy in the air, covering the tops of buildings like thick grey smoke. It dulled my mind and all I seemed able to do was trudge through life. How long will this fog go on, I wondered silently, the weather deeply embedded … Continue reading How Long?

A Morning Walk and Being a Flâneur

A few years ago, Rachel Pieh Jones did a blog series called Let's Go Flaneuring. The series was based on a French word flâneur, a word that was popular in nineteenth century France, particularly among writers. Essentially a flâneur was someone who walked (or rather - strolled). As the flâneur strolled, they observed. So they strolled and … Continue reading A Morning Walk and Being a Flâneur

Embracing the Sacred in the Ordinary

I wake early after a holiday weekend. It is dark and cold outside. I shiver, pulling my sky-blue, fluffy bathrobe around me. "I can do this" I think to myself. Who am I kidding? I can't do this. This day after day routine of early rising, walking to the subway, dodging leftover piles of snow, … Continue reading Embracing the Sacred in the Ordinary

A Baby and the Cold Slush of Winter

I slog my way through dirty, melting snow as I walk to work. The pristine fluffy white of one week ago is replaced by the dirt and grime of the city, coupled with slush caused by rising temperatures. It is Thursday, my last day of the work week, and I am tired. In winter everything … Continue reading A Baby and the Cold Slush of Winter

Soul Care and the Reconstruction Process

When you live in a city you cannot avoid the ever-present construction/reconstruction process. Cranes, detours, iconic orange cones, and construction workers with yellow hard hats and vests are a part of the city landscape. Healthy cities know that to continue to serve both residents and visitors, they need to repair, construct, and reconstruct. City planning … Continue reading Soul Care and the Reconstruction Process

The Resilient Orthodox – Explosions of Life

There are times when I feel like life has exploded, as though all parts of it collide and nothing goes the way it is supposed to go. From unexpected expenses to surprise illnesses, life laughs in the face of our careful planning, mocks our ideas of control, and smiles sarcastically at our shocked expressions. I'm … Continue reading The Resilient Orthodox – Explosions of Life

Reflections on Morning and Evening Prayers

  It's early morning. The day is waking to summer in all its blue-skyed glory. Birds sing and chirp loud in chorus  - a liturgical chant to welcome the day. I am standing at our icon corner, the place in our home where we say our morning and evening prayers. It is here where I … Continue reading Reflections on Morning and Evening Prayers

When a Lion Needs Courage

The Wizard of Oz is well-known by many. It is referenced in writing and in conversation; called an 'icon of pop-culture' for Americans. In terms of characters, there is Dorothy, a sweet cheery girl from Kansas who just wants to get home after she is displaced from the prairies to an unknown land. There is … Continue reading When a Lion Needs Courage

In Memory of George

George was one of those guys that I saw early morning. As I would wander up Tremont Street from the Park Street T Station he would be setting up in front of the Granary Burying Ground. This cemetery is Boston's third oldest cemetery and the final earthly resting place for the likes of Samuel Adams, … Continue reading In Memory of George

A Life Overseas – It Doesn’t Get Easier

   Will you join me today at A Life Overseas as I talk about poverty?                           ****** From my spot across the room, I heard an older woman talking to a young intern. “It will get easier – I promise!” We were in a … Continue reading A Life Overseas – It Doesn’t Get Easier

Defying the Definition of Beauty

I see her when I go to get coffee on a rainy afternoon. In a busy, city coffee shop, you see a lot of things. Black suited business people, musicians, law students, homeless, and tourists are just a few of those who walk in during the day. She is right in front of me with someone who … Continue reading Defying the Definition of Beauty

When the World Comes to You

It was over a year ago when Elizabeth Jones contacted me. She had been reading and interacting with Communicating Across Boundaries for a while at that point, always affirming and entering into discussion in meaningful ways. I am delighted to have Elizabeth guest post today! Elizabeth watched the world come to her through her work … Continue reading When the World Comes to You

These are the People in My Neighborhood

Our street is a short, one-way street, four blocks from the Charles River. It's lined with three-family homes, built at the turn of the century as industrial housing for people who worked at factories and needed places to live. The street gets mostly local traffic and even long-time residents of Cambridge don't always know where … Continue reading These are the People in My Neighborhood

The Bus Driver Who Waits

I stand and wait for the 64 bus. It's early in the day, and though the weather people promise a hot one, in this hour a cool breeze and bright sky makes for a beautiful morning. In cities all over the world, people rely on public transportation. Throughout the day they wait for the buses, trains, ferries, … Continue reading The Bus Driver Who Waits

All was Well

It's 5:30 in the morning and the street is quiet, save the birds who are singing their morning song with joyful abandon. I hear the sounds of distant traffic, because this is the city and the city never stops. It is now warm enough to sit outside in the early morning light, surrounded by soft … Continue reading All was Well

Seven Feet Under

Boston and surrounding areas are literally buried in snow. The entire public transportation system - commuter rails, subway, trolleys, ferries - have all shut down. The only thing moving is snow plows and a couple of buses that are groaning and creaking their way along snow filled roads. We have had seven feet of snow … Continue reading Seven Feet Under