“Pardon Our Dust”

We invite you to follow along with Marilyn and Robynn, both grace-desperate Christ followers– one a newly welcomed Orthodox the other a patchwork Protestant– on their Lenten journey. This is the first in this honestly human series.

 

Lowell and I, together with some friends, attended the evening Lenten Service at St Paul’s Episcopal church on Ash Wednesday. The nave is under construction and we met in the basement of the annex. Father Patrick took that inconvenient and unfortunate circumstance and skillfully wove it into the homily. He recalled another renovation experience he had when he was in grade six. At that time the Kansas City airport was under a significant renovation process. To his boyhood mind it seemed to be in disrepair for years. What stands out in his memory is the sign that was posted all over the airport for the duration of the project, “Pardon our Dust.” He went on to use the same disclaimer in connection with the church’s current construction project, pardon our dust.

During the homily Father Patrick said something I’m not likely to forget, “Ash Wednesday is the most honest day of the Christian calendar.” And it’s true, isn’t it? Ash Wednesday is a day we intentionally declare our brokenness, our need of rescue, our deep understanding that there is nothing we can do in our own strength or ingenuity to bring about the transformation we all need. We are marked with the sign of the cross, “Remember that you are dust and it is to dust you shall return.” We are reminded of our fragility and our brevity. Wearing the ashes on our forehead we announce to ourselves and to the world that we stand in need of grace and perpetual mercy.

Pardon our dust.

When we lived in North India we rented an ancient old stone house on the banks of the Ganges river. When we first moved in there were walls down and thick weeds growing up over some of the debris. The room that would later be transformed into a guest room had a hole in the roof and bird nests in the rafters. Mold grew up the walls of the courtyard. There were rocks piled up in front of the house. Termites had eaten door frames and window ledges. Another building that would later be changed into a retreat center was completely over run with branches and buried in its own brokenness.  Slowly we began to clear things out. Working together with friends we hired a contractor who rebuilt the guest room, added a bathroom and toilet and a sitting room. Over time we reclaimed corners in the courtyard and we planted flowers. We cut back the mango tree to allow in some sunshine. A kitchen was built, windows were screened, doors were repaired. Rocks were eventually cleared out, grass was grown, more flowers planted. Friends moved in after we left and more space was sanctified. It became this beautiful sacred place.

The thing that used to irk me the most, was when visitors would come, and like us, they would see the potential in the property. They had, of course, no idea how much work had already been done. All they could see was what could be done. They saw implicit promise and they’d remark on it.

Wow… this property is amazing!

Think about what you could do with the place!

The possibilities are limitless.  

Have you ever thought about planting a garden?

How did you find this place? It has so much potential.

Perhaps we should have posted signs, Pardon our dust. Acknowledging the potential seemed to deny the ongoing agonies of transformation we had already embarked on. It didn’t honour the work, the tears, the frustrations, the sweat, the struggle, the effort we had already expended. What we needed was for our guests to Pardon our Dust. We longed for them to admit the work of transformation, to see our desperate need for grace in the ongoing work of redemption. To sit with us in the place of brokenness. To have eyes to see the beauty in all of it–the broken bits, the cleaned up corners, the salvageable spaces. To clearly imagine what yet might happen, what glory might yet be shed across the yard, what visions of continued growth might be just around the corner.

Pardon our Dust also serves to remind us that these are temporary times. There is an end in sight. It’s true we’re limping along now, accommodations are being made, we’re making the appropriate changes. Like any renovation or construction project there is a beginning, a middle and an end. We will get through this. We will be made over. Transformation will happen.

Lent gives us this profound opportunity to admit our great need for a savior. For a season we’re honest about our propensity to sin and selfishness. We acknowledge our need. As a community we readily admit we need each other. We journey toward the cross. We travel together, human and humbled, knowing we’re on the way to reformation, all the while aware we are dust and our terrible need for pardon.

Dear People of God: The first Christians observed with great
devotion the days of our Lord’s passion and resurrection, and
it became the custom of the Church to prepare for them by a

season of penitence and fasting. This season of Lent provided
a time in which converts to the faith were prepared for Holy
Baptism. It was also a time when those who, because of
notorious sins, had been separated from the body of the faithful
were reconciled by penitence and forgiveness, and restored to
the fellowship of the Church. Thereby, the whole congregation
was put in mind of the message of pardon and absolution set
forth in the Gospel of our Savior, and of the need which all
Christians continually have to renew their repentance and faith.

I invite you, therefore, in the name of the Church, to the
observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance;
by prayer, fasting, and self-denial; and by reading and
meditating on God’s holy Word. And, to make a right beginning
of repentance, and as a mark of our mortal nature, let us now
kneel before the Lord, our maker and redeemer.

Almighty God, you have created us out of the dust of the
earth: Grant that these ashes may be to us a sign of our
mortality and penitence, that we may remember that it is
only by your gracious gift that we are given everlasting life;
through Jesus Christ our Savior. Amen.

Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.

(from The Book of Common Prayer)

4 thoughts on ““Pardon Our Dust”

  1. Thank you for this very interesting article Robyn. By the way, are you related to the ‘Bliss’ family that were in Lebanon years ago and I believe may have helped get The American University in Beirut started?

    karen kay perry

    On Fri, Mar 3, 2017 at 10:15 AM, communicating across the boundaries of faith & culture wrote:

    > Robynn Bliss posted: “We invite you to follow along with Marilyn and > Robynn, both grace-desperate Christ followers– one a newly welcomed > Orthodox the other a patchwork Protestant– on their Lenten journey. This > is the first in this honestly human series. Lowell and ” >

    Like

  2. This week I went to my first Ash Wednesday service — WOW. It made such an unexpected impact on me. From the very first kneeling prayer, I was in tears, tears that were pooling on the bottom of my glasses because of the angle at which I had knelt over. When that prayer was over, we got up and I thought, oh dear I didn’t bring any tissues!

    Anyway, yes, it was good because it was honest — the most honest day of the year is a good description for it. Beforehand I had spoken with the priest’s wife, and she said she looks forward to this service all year. Now I understand why. It was so much more refreshing and cleansing than when I went to their (the Anglicans’) Easter Vigil. Not sure why that is, it just is.

    And since everyone has the ashes on their foreheads, the rest of the service doesn’t even feel awkward. It wasn’t till I went home and my family was shocked at my appearance (I had gone alone) that I realized how strange this custom seems. I told my husband how good it was and he mentioned something about me having this big spiritual experience. Funny thing was, I didn’t feel spiritual in the least. I felt all broken and small and truthful and needy, not great and mighty and spiritual. At the same time I felt so connected to the rest of my very dust-like friends and fellow worshipers. We are all in the same needy, broken boat.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Thank you, Robynn, for putting such things of my own heart into words…written down so beautifully and shared so nobly. I thank God for you, my friend. Thank you for sharing your gift with the world!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ah! It appears we all are Lenting together this year. I love the concept of being in “temporary times.’ It always is so, though we rarely recognize it.

    Thank you, Robyn, for this beautiful reflection on where we might have been, where we are, and most importantly our potential in the days to come.

    Liked by 1 person

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