Anniversaries and Durgin Park


 My mom and dad met, courted, and got engaged in the city of Boston. They attended college in the city and when we asked Dad when he first noticed Mom, he said “Our junior year, when I was class president and your mom was secretary. I thought she was very efficient.”

And with those romantic words, an uncommon union was born.

So on Tuesday, to celebrate their anniversary of 64 years, we took them to a restaurant they remembered from their college years. Durgin Park is a Boston institution. It has been a landmark of the area since 1827. Their tag line is “We serve history!’ If walls and red, gingham table cloths could talk, they would have tales to tell. Instead, the people who tell these tales are the wait staff. If you want no-nonsense staff who talk back to you and tell you what’s what – Durgin Park is the place for you.

We were fortunate to have Gina – the head hostess – as our server. Gina is Sicilian and has worked at the restaurant for over 40 years. Behind her quick tongue and biting retorts is a heart that loves people and it warmed our hearts to find that she was sincerely interested in who we were. As we ate Yankee Pot Roast, Boston Baked Beans, and corn bread she sat with us and told us some of the history and stories of Durgin Park.

The restaurant served sea men who got off work at 6:30 in the morning. They would come over after long shifts to eat and drink. After a few drinks, they would say all manner of things to the women who worked there. After a while, these women tired of it and decided to give it back. And give it back they did and they do. You do not mess with Durgin Park wait staff!

Don’t go to Durgin Park if you want a quiet, romantic evening. Go if you want to find out more about Boston and experience the Boston that is so much better than the arrogant academics. Go if you’re tired of business men and women who rush through the streets in their chic black uniforms. Go to Durgin Park if you want old Boston. Go if you want to talk and be talked at; go if you want to be served history.

On Tuesday, we chose to be served history as we celebrated my parents. It has been 64 years of marriage on two continents and many houses and cities. The results are obvious. Five children, seventeen grandchildren, spouses of grandchildren and soon to be ten great grands. But there is so much more. The years of prayer and stubborn commitment; the years of travel that included too many goodbyes and hellos to count. And always the years of joy that were woven through all of it.

Durgin Park was witness to one more important thing in history – the celebration of my parent’s life together.

So if you get to Boston this summer, head to Durgin Park, ask for Gina – and tell her the family who celebrated their parent’s 64th anniversary sent you. If she needs further reminders, ask her about her hair dryer.

6 thoughts on “Anniversaries and Durgin Park

  1. I missed this post until this morning! I love it! It makes me want to go to Durgin Park when we’re there. Congratulations to Uncle Ralph and Auntie Polly! 64 years is a mighty long time!

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  2. Marilyn, Now back home, I just read this and I love it! You really captured the experience of our 64th anniversary celebration! I laughed so hard at your last paragraph, almost as hard as we all laughed on Tuesday evening. Thanks again for a most memorable time, in Rockport and in Boston. Love you dearest daughter!

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  3. Many of the years my daughters were at RISD, I flew in and out of the Providence airport. Once we move to Dubai, the Boston airport became more convenient (and cheaper) so I have eaten at one of the branches of Durgin Park, where I ordered the Yankee Pot Roast and a local beer – because it seemed the thing to do when in Yankee Land. Next time I’m in the neighborhood, I will try to get to the original to meet Gina. (Perhaps you’ll come with me?) I wish many more happy anniversaries to your parents, Marilyn! They are an inspiration!

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