Cairo in Review – Travel is Fatal

Bloggers Note – Thank you everybody who responded and chose to follow this blog following the post Tahrir Square – Walls and Graffiti being Freshly Pressed. I hope to respond to all your comments and appreciate that you decided to follow this blog. Here’s hoping you won’t be disappointed.

One of my readers and friends commented on the post “These are the Moments – Alexandria, Egypt” that she felt the stories from our trip to Egypt would tumble out once back in Cambridge. While they are not tumbling, they are swirling around my brain and I know I am not finished writing about them. A quote attributed to Mark Twain says that “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” Perhaps it is also fatal to contentment for it is hard to be content with the normal when you have experienced the extraordinary.

This post then, is an attempt to give glimpses of the extraordinary through pictures and narrative. Thank you for taking the trip along with me to Egypt, an extraordinary place with extraordinary people.

The Beginning

Arriving in Cairo on a Thursday afternoon is like arriving in a western nation on a Friday afternoon. There is a sense in the air that the work week is ending and as we arrived there was a celebratory feel that had nothing to do with the fact that it’s two days before Christmas and everything to do with the end of a work week. As I said in an earlier post, the comfort of familiarity greeted us immediately – we were, in many ways, home. We settled into the guest house where we were staying and then headed to Annie’s apartment on a busy street near Midan Falaki. The kusherie shop at the entrance to her building brought tantalizing smells of lentils, pasta, rice and spicy tomato sauce. Through a side entrance we took a rickety, ancient elevator careful to heed the warnings of a man who let us know that no more than three people should be riding at a time. The elevator stopped at the 9th floor, top of the building and we spent a good hour ooohing and aaahing over the view. It was incredible. The Mokattam hills stretched out miles away and a Coptic church was in the foreground. Across the street were the dusty remains of an ancient outdoor theatre, long gone but chairs still sitting ready for a show. Just below to the right we saw four tanks and ten army men in full riot gear, at the ready should any trouble erupt. This did not give us comfort but rather made us realize the force that is sometimes quietly, and other times loudly used against protesters. An early dinner of shawerma and fuul bean sandwiches was followed by chai and shisha in a coffee shop across a busy street and down a side street from the apartment. After hours of talk and laughter we headed back to Zamalek and a jet lagged sleep, fully of satisfaction and the comfort of belonging.

View from Annie’s Roof top

Tahrir Square, Bab Zuweila and More…

Friday is the Muslim Holy day and is a day off in Egypt. Sermons from mosques throughout the city are periodically heard and men gather in large numbers at local mosques to observe this holy day through prayers and meeting together. We headed out to get a lunch of fateer (Egyptian pizza) close to Tahrir Square where a large demonstration was taking place. Newspapers quoted numbers of 50,000 and more at the square. We were amazed by the passion and numbers, something that was quickly squelched during the Mubarak years and now a common occurrence. Graffiti on newly constructed walls and leftover from the uprising in January captured our attention and the lens of the camera. We took a slow walk from Tahrir   Square over to the Nile where we took a boat ride, something that has long been a favorite family activity, on the Nile. Dinner at a Yemeni restaurant ended a day that will stay in our memories for many years.

We headed out to Bab Zuweila and the Khan el Khalili on Saturday, Christmas Eve. If you ever go to Cairo, Bab Zuweila is a must see, must do. Despite living in Cairo for seven years and many trips back, it was only in 2010 that I entered this medieval gate and climbed the minarets to the mosque beside the gates. The minarets give a 360 degree view of the city and it was an overwhelming sense of how small I am in this city of millions.

We took the short walk from Bab Zuweila to the Khan el Khalili market and walked  into one of the many entrances to this well-known tourist destination. The spice shop we have gone to for years was still there, solid through change and revolution, pungent aromas and spices you never see in the west ready in large burlap sacks.

Despite the vendors constant shouts of “Let me help you spend your money!” “Welcome to Alaska” and “Come here, I have lovely things for you to buy!” I still love this market. I love the game of bargaining and finding treasures for pennies. I love being served tea while I pick out perfume bottles. I love ending the shopping experience with mint tea at Fishawy’s café.

After cleaning up from the dust of the city, we put on our Christmas Eve best and met at the Lebanese restaurant Taboula in the heart of Garden City. Mezzas of every kind, fresh pita bread, and aseer lemon (frothy lemon juice) was a perfect Christmas Eve meal, followed by a 10:30 pm service at the All Saints Cathedral in Zamalek. Time was rushing past and I wanted to hold it back, hold it tight so that it wouldn’t escape us like a dream. Now as I sit in Cambridge, it feels like a dream.

Cairo Tower from the vantage point of a boat in the Nile

Walking to Khan el Khalili after Bab Zuweila

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Christmas Day and Alexandria

No snow greeted us on Christmas day but clear skies and 68 degree weather were reminders of many past Christmases. Christmas dinner was roasted chickens from a street vendor with traditional condiments served buffet style in a high apartment overlooking Tahrir Square. We celebrated with friends of Annie’s from various places around the globe. Growing up overseas and then living overseas as long as we have makes us quite passionate and vocal about God not being an American, but rather a global God with an international vision. Christmas overlooking Tahrir was one more reminder of many of the truth of that belief.

The day after Christmas saw us on a train to Alexandria, beautiful city on the Mediterranean. You can read more here but this too was an extraordinary trip and an amazing time. The Alexandria Library is a beautiful building with a rich history and serves as both a place of learning as well as a cultural center. A must see in the city of Alexandria. This city has a different and more relaxed feel to it than Cairo – perhaps it’s the Mediterranean air that works its way into the psyche and affects everything from the pace to the general mood. It is another reminder of all that Egypt has to offer the world.

Pyramids, Bulaq and Al Azhar Park

Our last days in Cairo included family favorites. Egypt is best known for the ancient Pyramids,said to be the oldest and only remaining ancient wonders of the world. Built around 2600 BC, they are beyond what you can imagine – only this time, I stayed back for coffee and shopping with Annie while the others headed out for horseback riding out into the desert and another visit to the pyramids. I know some of you may be thinking “Are you kidding? You skipped a trip to the pyramids!” but let me assure you, I have been to them dozens of times and have been wowed every time. Plus – I didn’t want to put my 51 year-old body on a horse. The stories that came out of the trip for the rest of the family are not mine to tell but are great and include a falling horse and amazing pictures.

We ended our time on Thursday at Al Azhar Park. This park is my favorite place in Cairo besides Marty’s balcony. In a city with little green space, the park is an oasis with views that cannot be described. I wrote about this park in the post “In Praise of Green Space” so will not go into more detail here, but it is a calm and beautiful space in a city where you need to get refreshment.

Back in Cambridge Cairo feels like a dream but bearing witness in narratives is as old as life itself – so thank you for listening and letting me bear witness to our trip through this medium. I realize that even as I write, the words are far too many and I don’t want to bore. So I’ll end with pictures and hope that you want more! I have said this before, and I’ll say it many more times – it is a privilege to share just a bit of this country. It is so much more than you will see on Fox news or CNN. It is so much more than the pyramids and old mosques. It is a people and a place that move into your heart and mind so that you beg to experience more.

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22 thoughts on “Cairo in Review – Travel is Fatal

  1. I loved this, I loved the trip to Egypt, your words filled my senses. I am going to come back and read more but what i said in the email stays. There is much more that is not there in this. You need to write it all down, whether you wish to share or not that is upto you.

    God is a Universal God, one with no beginning and no end. We are in AD 2012 that means two thousand and twelve years have passed since the birth of Christ… Just how old is USA????? How does God become an American God beats logic completely…. sorry just had to say it.

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    1. Oh you are so right…so much more that I don’t want to bore people with. I also think you’re right that some of my posts written quickly without a filter are my best posts! My most passionate anyway – wait till you see todays…..!
      “Just how old is the US? How does God become an American God beats logic completely!” Oh how I love that quote! Did you ever see my post “God is not an American?” Thanks so much for your always clear, sometimes controversial, always challenging, always insightful comments!

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  2. “Normal” keeps popping up. Who can define normal? Relish every moment of life whether it fits one person’s definition or not.

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    1. Wise words Bettie….maybe the difference is that there is “normal” expectation in many places for what people will do – ie grow up, get a degree, get married, settle down, take occasional trips or cruises, retire…when you’ve grown up with a different “normal” than that, it can be so hard to adjust to society’s expectations. You don’t want to “settle” down or be locked into a mortgage (no matter how practical that seems) thus the agitation that Robynn, Amira and I referenced. Does that make sense?

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  3. I savor every single word and visual picture you share! What love and admiration for Egypt you convey . . . and that is such a gift. You are so right about the limited vision conveyed by media images. (Although some have done justice to personal stories, haven’t they, and maybe that’s the clue: personal stories.) You have opened my mind and heart to an extraordinary place and people, one that I knew so little of before knowing you. I love this blog!

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    1. Personal stories do resonate – I know we’ve found that through our workshops! Thank you so much for reading, commenting and affirming this blogging journey. Thanks especially for walking this road with me through so many years of my adjustment, readjustment, rants, angst and stories!!

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      1. And now I have so many more questions . . . such as, if Friday is the Muslim Holy Day, is the weekend then Friday and Saturday? Is Sunday a workday in Egypt? If one attends a church service instead of a mosque, on what day is that held? There will be more . . .!

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  4. Thanks for the trip down memory lane and the new insights. I even enjoyed the pyramids and camel pictures! I used to love walking in the area of the Khan el Khalili and the walking over to the tentmaker area. I felt like I was in the middle of the most exciting place on earth, very thrilling for the senses! So happy you got to go back again! I wonder if I ever will? Enjoyed your post Marilyn!

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    1. I love that area so much as well Cathy. It is thrilling and the bright colors mixed with everything else make the area truly alive. Thank you for taking the trip down memory lane with me.

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  5. hey there — sitting here in cairo (too cold out on my now-famous balcony, thanks to you!) looking at your fotos, i think “i need to get out more!” still haven’t quite forgiven you for coming while we were away, but i’m working on it…xoxo

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    1. I haven’t quite forgiven myself….so glad you liked the photos. We didn’t even get to talk by phone because as you left the U.S, I came in. I waved at you through the friendly skies.

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  6. My worst fears though include losing the “agitation” that Amira describes. I don’t want to ever be completely settled in the “normal” — I hold on to memories of the extraordinary and panic when the details begin to fade over time…. This is the psychosis of the well travel perhaps.

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    1. I think I would agree with you. Are we perhaps called to an agitation of sorts? What does contentment look like? Are we kept aware and agitated so we can communicate to others that there is a bigger world and bigger God? Now there’s a guest post for you Robynn! I look forward to having you write more this year!

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    1. I felt that way about your trip to Mongolia Bettie! And as you know – when you try and chronicle the really great stuff gets lost! Thanks for being willing to read the thoughts and all the emotions that go with the journey.

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  7. You sure had a nice time in Cairo.

    And I totally agree with this
    “it is hard to be content with the normal when you have experienced the extraordinary”.

    I could not have stated that better. but the moment I saw that line I thought WOW that’s explains my agitation … :)

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    1. Amira – thank you so much for reading and commenting. Glad you can relate to my sentiments. I think there are many of us who have lived between two worlds who feel that and so when the normal feels like it’s taking over the agitation, as you describe it, kicks in.

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